• MeisterSinger Story

    „The quality of a violin begins with the time its wood takes to grow.“

    Lukas Kehnen, Violin maker

In search of that special sound: Master violin maker Lukas Kehnen

To create an exceptional violin body, Lukas Kehnen not only needs perfect craftsmanship and the very best material, but also
a great deal of time and dedication. We visited the young master violin maker in his workshop and had the opportunity to get to know him and his work for a day.

The first thing you notice is that modern technology is hardly to be seen. All the tools, the materials, the manufacturing steps – practically nothing has changed in the sophisticated world of violin-making since the days of Stradivarius. “An instrument with a special character can only be made by hand,” says Lukas Kehnen.

„An instrument with a special character can only be made by hand.“
Lukas Kehnen, Violin maker

It all starts with the right wood.

Each violin body is made of very special types of spruce and maple wood. The ideal woods come from high alpine regions where the summers are shorter, which causes the annual rings to grow more evenly and densely, an essential factor for the quality of the instrument.

Lukas Kehnen purchases the wood for his violins from a tonewood merchant, who cuts up selected trees according to a special procedure and dries them under controlled conditions for at least 5 years. From growth to storage – it’s time that makes the wood sound so special.

A violin is only finished when it's finished.

Around 150 working hours go into manufacturing a top-class instrument – and sometimes even more. “The most important thing is not to be in a hurry,” says Lukas Kehnen, “as that only disturbs the concentration.” Cutting out and fine planing the body requires a great deal of dedication and patience.

Measuring, tapping, and sanding – the same working steps are repeated over and over. Lukas Kehnen becomes completely engrossed in his work and sometimes even forgets the time around him. His own experience and feeling tell him when a workpiece is finally finished – and not a technical device.

The color also helps to make beautiful music.

When making the lacquer, Lukas Kehnen only uses substances that the old Italian masters formerly worked with: Natural resins with illustrious-sounding names such as shellac, mastic, sandarac, and manila copal. It can take time to find the right mixture, particularly when restoring an old instrument.

In no other working phase is Lukas Kehnen so focused as when concocting and applying the various layers of lacquer. At some point, however, he does take a look at his watch: A MeisterSinger N° 01 with a brown suede leather strap.

10 Questions for... violin maker Lukas Kehnen

MeisterSinger:
Mr. Kehnen, what does perfection look like in your line of work?

Lukas Kehnen:
That’s hard to say. I can simply hear and feel it when something is perfect.

MeisterSinger:
How do you feel in general about quality?

Lukas Kehnen:
Normally I’m no friend of mass products, but fast food is ok every once in a while.

MeisterSinger:
How often do you look at your watch during work?

Lukas Kehnen:
Every now and then to bring structure into my day. When I’m completely absorbed in my work I just use my internal clock.

MeisterSinger:
How do you manage not to chase after each second?

Lukas Kehnen:
I focus on the things that lie in front of me. And block everything else out as much as possible.

MeisterSinger:
In which moment do you most like to forget time?

Lukas Kehnen:
While whitewater canoeing, preferably on the river Soča in Slovenia.

MeisterSinger:
To whom would you give 100 hours if you could?

Lukas Kehnen:
To my family, whom I’m very grateful to for a lot of things.

MeisterSinger:
And for what would you like to steal 100 hours?

Lukas Kehnen:
For wine tasting in Cremona, the centre of Italian violin making.

MeisterSinger:
How many watches do you own?

Lukas Kehnen:
A simple Pegasus Quartz and, as of recently, a MeisterSinger No 01.

MeisterSinger:
What do you like in particular about the MeisterSinger concept of this one-hand watch?

Lukas Kehnen:
I like the tidy design. But also the idea behind it; to not let yourself be rushed.

MeisterSinger:
What time is it now?

Lukas Kehnen:
4:05 pm

Typeface designer Lukas Schneider

„Taking time, approaching the optimum organically, that’s all part of the art.“

  • MeisterSinger Story

    „Good typeface design is the art of making an impact without being in the foreground.“

    Lukas Schneider, Typeface designer

Fascinated by spaces: Typeface designer Lukas Schneider

There are around half a million typefaces. Some of them we see constantly, others probably never.
But what are the differences between them? Typeface designer Lukas Schneider invited us to his studio and explained to us what his profession is all about.

The workbench in the middle of the room is noticeably tidy: Sheets of paper, pencils, reference books, a large screen – everything is exactly in its place. “Typeface design has a lot to do with order,” Lukas Schneider remarks, “but it looks a lot less orderly
around here when no one is visiting.”

A perfect line isn’t perfect.

Although there is excellent software for his profession, Lukas Schneider always begins developing a new typeface with hand-drawn sketches, as working directly on a computer could tempt him to draw the contours of a letter with mathematical perfection, i.e., too straight. However, the result would then seem too sterile.

The pencil, on the other hand, brings small inaccuracies into play, making the typeface seem harmonious to the human eye. “Taking time, approaching the optimum organically, that’s all part of the art,” says Lukas Schneider.

„Taking time, approaching the optimum organically, that’s all part of the art.“
Lukas Schneider, Typeface designer

Genuine quality is unobtrusive.

Serifs, majuscule heights, descenders – when Lukas Schneider talks about his sphere of expertise, it soon becomes clear how many different characteristics a typeface can have. The fact that laypeople often don’t even notice the details in his work doesn’t bother Lukas Schneider in the least, in fact it’s quite the contrary:

“A good typeface doesn’t necessarily need to be in the foreground. The important thing is that it works, that it is easy to read.” The months and sometimes even years a designer invests in a typeface simply save the reader time in the end.

The challenge of finding the right space.

A typeface designer only spends a part of his time with developing the letters. He dedicates a large portion of it to the white space between them. In the working step known as “kerning” the specific distance between certain combinations of letters is optimized.

Looking, allowing it to take effect, correcting. “In actual fact, my work is never completely finished,” says Lukas Schneider. “The difficult thing is to simply let go at a certain point.” As he speaks, he casually glances at his watch: A MeisterSinger Metris Bronze Line.

10 Questions for... Typeface designer Lukas Schneider

MeisterSinger:
Mr. Schneider, what does perfection look like in your line of work?

Lukas Schneider:
A balanced relationship between perfection and imperfection.

MeisterSinger:
How do you feel in general about quality?

Lukas Schneider:
For the most part, quality is important to me. But for example if I’m buying felt tip pens for my daughter, it doesn’t have to be a top product.

MeisterSinger:
How often do you look at your watch during work?

Lukas Schneider:
I look at it now and again to get a hold of myself when I find myself in a flow state.

MeisterSinger:
How do you manage not to chase after each second?

Lukas Schneider:
That actually happens automatically for me.

MeisterSinger:
In which moment do you most like to forget time?

Lukas Schneider:
With my young daughter on the water slide at the swimming pool.

MeisterSinger:
To whom would you give 100 hours if you could?

Lukas Schneider:
To my mother who more than deserves that.

MeisterSinger:
And for what would you like to steal 100 hours?

Lukas Schneider:
For a short holiday on Ibiza with my family.

MeisterSinger:
How many watches do you own?

Lukas Schneider:
A Seiko and a MeisterSinger Metris.

MeisterSinger:
What do you like in particular about the MeisterSinger concept of this one-hand watch?

Lukas Schneider:
It’s a unusual idea that I haven’t seen before like this. From a professional point of view I’m very impressed by the design of the dial.

MeisterSinger:
What time is it now?

Lukas Schneider:
Almost exactly midday.

Violin maker Lukas Kehnen

„Die Qualität einer Geige beginnt schon mit der Zeit, die ihr Holz zum Wachsen braucht.“

  • MeisterSinger Story

    „Good typeface design is the art of making an impact without being in the foreground.“

    Lukas Schneider, Typeface designer

Fascinated by spaces: Typeface designer Lukas Schneider

There are around half a million typefaces. Some of them we see constantly, others probably never.
But what are the differences between them? Typeface designer Lukas Schneider invited us to his studio and explained to us what his profession is all about.

The workbench in the middle of the room is noticeably tidy: Sheets of paper, pencils, reference books, a large screen – everything is exactly in its place. “Typeface design has a lot to do with order,” Lukas Schneider remarks, “but it looks a lot less orderly
around here when no one is visiting.”

A perfect line isn’t perfect.

Although there is excellent software for his profession, Lukas Schneider always begins developing a new typeface with hand-drawn sketches, as working directly on a computer could tempt him to draw the contours of a letter with mathematical perfection, i.e., too straight. However, the result would then seem too sterile.

The pencil, on the other hand, brings small inaccuracies into play, making the typeface seem harmonious to the human eye. “Taking time, approaching the optimum organically, that’s all part of the art,” says Lukas Schneider.

„Taking time, approaching the optimum organically, that’s all part of the art.“
Lukas Schneider, Typeface designer

Genuine quality is unobtrusive.

Serifs, majuscule heights, descenders – when Lukas Schneider talks about his sphere of expertise, it soon becomes clear how many different characteristics a typeface can have. The fact that laypeople often don’t even notice the details in his work doesn’t bother Lukas Schneider in the least, in fact it’s quite the contrary:

“A good typeface doesn’t necessarily need to be in the foreground. The important thing is that it works, that it is easy to read.” The months and sometimes even years a designer invests in a typeface simply save the reader time in the end.

The challenge of finding the right space.

A typeface designer only spends a part of his time with developing the letters. He dedicates a large portion of it to the white space between them. In the working step known as “kerning” the specific distance between certain combinations of letters is optimized.

Looking, allowing it to take effect, correcting. “In actual fact, my work is never completely finished,” says Lukas Schneider. “The difficult thing is to simply let go at a certain point.” As he speaks, he casually glances at his watch: A MeisterSinger Metris Bronze Line.

10 Questions for... Typeface designer Lukas Schneider

MeisterSinger:
Mr. Schneider, what does perfection look like in your line of work?

Lukas Schneider:
A balanced relationship between perfection and imperfection.

MeisterSinger:
How do you feel in general about quality?

Lukas Schneider:
For the most part, quality is important to me. But for example if I’m buying felt tip pens for my daughter, it doesn’t have to be a top product.

MeisterSinger:
How often do you look at your watch during work?

Lukas Schneider:
I look at it now and again to get a hold of myself when I find myself in a flow state.

MeisterSinger:
How do you manage not to chase after each second?

Lukas Schneider:
That actually happens automatically for me.

MeisterSinger:
In which moment do you most like to forget time?

Lukas Schneider:
With my young daughter on the water slide at the swimming pool.

MeisterSinger:
To whom would you give 100 hours if you could?

Lukas Schneider:
To my mother who more than deserves that.

MeisterSinger:
And for what would you like to steal 100 hours?

Lukas Schneider:
For a short holiday on Ibiza with my family.

MeisterSinger:
How many watches do you own?

Lukas Schneider:
A Seiko and a MeisterSinger Metris.

MeisterSinger:
What do you like in particular about the MeisterSinger concept of this one-hand watch?

Lukas Schneider:
It’s a unusual idea that I haven’t seen before like this. From a professional point of view I’m very impressed by the design of the dial.

MeisterSinger:
What time is it now?

Lukas Schneider:
Almost exactly midday.

Violin maker Lukas Kehnen

„Die Qualität einer Geige beginnt schon mit der Zeit, die ihr Holz zum Wachsen braucht.“

  • MeisterSinger Story

    „The quality of a violin begins with the time its wood takes to grow.“

    Lukas Kehnen, Violin maker

In search of that special sound: Master violin maker Lukas Kehnen

To create an exceptional violin body, Lukas Kehnen not only needs perfect craftsmanship and the very best material, but also
a great deal of time and dedication. We visited the young master violin maker in his workshop and had the opportunity to get to know him and his work for a day.

The first thing you notice is that modern technology is hardly to be seen. All the tools, the materials, the manufacturing steps – practically nothing has changed in the sophisticated world of violin-making since the days of Stradivarius. “An instrument with a special character can only be made by hand,” says Lukas Kehnen.

„An instrument with a special character can only be made by hand.“
Lukas Kehnen, Violin maker

It all starts with the right wood.

Each violin body is made of very special types of spruce and maple wood. The ideal woods come from high alpine regions where the summers are shorter, which causes the annual rings to grow more evenly and densely, an essential factor for the quality of the instrument.

Lukas Kehnen purchases the wood for his violins from a tonewood merchant, who cuts up selected trees according to a special procedure and dries them under controlled conditions for at least 5 years. From growth to storage – it’s time that makes the wood sound so special.

A violin is only finished when it's finished.

Around 150 working hours go into manufacturing a top-class instrument – and sometimes even more. “The most important thing is not to be in a hurry,” says Lukas Kehnen, “as that only disturbs the concentration.” Cutting out and fine planing the body requires a great deal of dedication and patience.

Measuring, tapping, and sanding – the same working steps are repeated over and over. Lukas Kehnen becomes completely engrossed in his work and sometimes even forgets the time around him. His own experience and feeling tell him when a workpiece is finally finished – and not a technical device.

The color also helps to make beautiful music.

When making the lacquer, Lukas Kehnen only uses substances that the old Italian masters formerly worked with: Natural resins with illustrious-sounding names such as shellac, mastic, sandarac, and manila copal. It can take time to find the right mixture, particularly when restoring an old instrument.

In no other working phase is Lukas Kehnen so focused as when concocting and applying the various layers of lacquer. At some point, however, he does take a look at his watch: A MeisterSinger N° 01 with a brown suede leather strap.

10 Questions for... violin maker Lukas Kehnen

MeisterSinger:
Mr. Kehnen, what does perfection look like in your line of work?

Lukas Kehnen:
That’s hard to say. I can simply hear and feel it when something is perfect.

MeisterSinger:
How do you feel in general about quality?

Lukas Kehnen:
Normally I’m no friend of mass products, but fast food is ok every once in a while.

MeisterSinger:
How often do you look at your watch during work?

Lukas Kehnen:
Every now and then to bring structure into my day. When I’m completely absorbed in my work I just use my internal clock.

MeisterSinger:
How do you manage not to chase after each second?

Lukas Kehnen:
I focus on the things that lie in front of me. And block everything else out as much as possible.

MeisterSinger:
In which moment do you most like to forget time?

Lukas Kehnen:
While whitewater canoeing, preferably on the river Soča in Slovenia.

MeisterSinger:
To whom would you give 100 hours if you could?

Lukas Kehnen:
To my family, whom I’m very grateful to for a lot of things.

MeisterSinger:
And for what would you like to steal 100 hours?

Lukas Kehnen:
For wine tasting in Cremona, the centre of Italian violin making.

MeisterSinger:
How many watches do you own?

Lukas Kehnen:
A simple Pegasus Quartz and, as of recently, a MeisterSinger No 01.

MeisterSinger:
What do you like in particular about the MeisterSinger concept of this one-hand watch?

Lukas Kehnen:
I like the tidy design. But also the idea behind it; to not let yourself be rushed.

MeisterSinger:
What time is it now?

Lukas Kehnen:
4:05 pm

Typeface designer Lukas Schneider

„Taking time, approaching the optimum organically, that’s all part of the art.“

  • MeisterSinger Story

    „Gutes Schriftdesign ist die Kunst zu wirken, ohne dabei vordergründig aufzufallen.“

    Lukas Schneider, Schriftgestalter

Fasziniert von Zwischenräumen: Schriftgestalter Lukas Schneider

Es gibt rund eine halbe Million Schriften. Einige davon begegnen uns ständig, andere wahrscheinlich nie. Aber was macht eigentlich die Unterschiede aus? Schriftgestalter Lukas Schneider hat uns in sein
Atelier eingeladen und uns erklärt, worauf es in seinem Fach ankommt.

Der Arbeitstisch in der Mitte des Raumes ist auffallend aufgeräumt: Papierbögen, Zeichenstifte, Fachbücher, ein großer Bildschirm – alles exakt an seinem Platz. „Schriftgestaltung hat viel mit Ordnung zu tun“, merkt Lukas Schneider an, „aber wenn ich keinen Besuch habe, sieht es hier auch mal wilder aus.“

Eine perfekte Linie ist nicht perfekt.

Obwohl es ausgezeichnete Software für sein Fach gibt, beginnt Lukas Schneider die Entwicklung einer neuen Schrift immer mit handgezeichneten Skizzen. Die unmittelbare Arbeit am Computer könnte dazu verleiten, die Konturen eines Buchstabens mathematisch perfekt, also zu gerade zu ziehen. Das Ergebnis würde dann steril wirken.

Der Zeichenstift bringt dagegen kleine Ungenauigkeiten
ins Spiel, wodurch sich das Schriftbild für das menschliche Auge harmonisch anfühlt.

„Sich Zeit nehmen, sich organisch dem Optimum annähern, darin liegt ein Teil der Kunst.“
Lukas Schneider, Schriftgestalter

Echte Qualität ist unaufdringlich.

Serifen, Majuskelhöhen, Unterlängen – wenn Lukas Schneider über sein Fachgebiet spricht, wird schnell deutlich, wie viele verschiedene Merkmale eine Schrift aufweisen kann. Dass einem Laien die Details
seiner Arbeit oftmals gar nicht auffallen, findet Lukas Schneider nicht so schlimm; im Gegenteil:
„Eine gute Schrift spielt sich nicht zwangsläufig in den Vordergrund. Wichtig ist, dass sie funktioniert, also dass man sie gut erfassen kann.“ Die Monate, manchmal Jahre, die ein Gestalter in einen Schriftschnitt investiert, bringen dem Leser letztlich einfach einen Zeitgewinn.

Die Herausforderung, den richtigen Abstand zu finden.

Mit dem Entwickeln der Buchstaben verbringt ein Schriftgestalter nur einen Teil seiner Zeit. Einen großen Teil widmet er dem Weißraum zwischen den Zeichen. Im „Kerning“ genannten Arbeitsschritt wird der spezifische Abstand zwischen bestimmten Buchstabenkombinationen optimiert.

Anschauen, wirken lassen, korrigieren. „Meine Arbeit ist eigentlich nie ganz fertig“, sagt Lukas Schneider. „Die Schwierigkeit ist, an einem gewissen Punkt loszulassen.“ Dabei schaut er ganz beiläufig auf seine
Uhr: eine MeisterSinger Metris aus der Bronze-Linie.

10 Fragen an... Schriftgestalter Lukas Schneider

MeisterSinger:
Herr Schneider, was bedeutet Perfektion in Bezug auf Ihre Arbeit?

Lukas Schneider:
Ein ausgewogenes Verhältnis von Perfektion und Imperfektion.

MeisterSinger:
Welches Verhältnis haben Sie generell zu Qualität?

Lukas Schneider:
Größtenteils ist mir Qualität wichtig. Aber wenn es z.B. um Filzstifte für meine Tochter geht, dann muss es kein Top-Produkt sein.

MeisterSinger:
Wie oft schauen Sie bei der Arbeit auf die Uhr?

Lukas Schneider:
Ich schaue öfter mal auf die Uhr, um mich wieder einzufangen, wenn ich in einem Flow-Zustand bin.

MeisterSinger:
Wie gelingt es Ihnen am besten, nicht den Sekunden hinterher zu jagen?

Lukas Schneider:
Das ist bei mir eigentlich ein Automatismus.

MeisterSinger:
In welchem Moment vergessen sie die Zeit am liebsten?

Lukas Schneider:
Mit meiner kleinen Tochter auf der Wasserrutsche im Schwimmbad.

MeisterSinger:
Wem würden Sie gern 100 Stunden schenken, wenn Sie könnten?

Lukas Schneider:
Meiner Mutter, die hat es mehr als verdient.

MeisterSinger:
Und wofür würden Sie sich gern 100 Stunden stehlen?

Lukas Schneider:
Für einen Kurzurlaub auf Ibiza mit meiner Familie.

MeisterSinger:
Wie viele Uhren besitzen Sie?

Lukas Schneider:
Eine Seiko und eine MeisterSinger Metris.

MeisterSinger:
Was gefällt Ihnen besonders am MeisterSinger Konzept der Einzeigeruhr?

Lukas Schneider:
Eine außergewöhnliche Idee, die ich so noch nicht gesehen habe. Aus professioneller Sicht finde ich die Gestaltung des Ziffernblatts sehr gelungen.

MeisterSinger:
Wie spät ist es jetzt?

Lukas Schneider:
Ziemlich genau Mittagszeit.

Geigenbaumeister Lukas Kehnen

„Die Qualität einer Geige beginnt schon mit der Zeit, die ihr Holz zum Wachsen braucht.“

  • MeisterSinger Story

    „Die Qualität einer Geige beginnt schon mit der Zeit, die ihr Holz zum Wachsen braucht.“

    Lukas Kehnen, Geigenbaumeister

Auf der Suche nach dem besonderen Klang: Geigenbaumeister Lukas Kehnen

Um einen außergewöhnlichen Klangkörper zu erschaffen, benötigt Lukas Kehnen nicht nur handwerkliche Perfektion und das beste Material, sondern auch viel Hingabe und Zeit. Wir haben den jungen Geigenbaumeister in seiner Werkstatt besucht und durften einen Tag lang seine Arbeit kennenlernen.

Zunächst fällt auf, dass so gut wie keine moderne Technik zu sehen ist. Sämtliche Werkzeuge, die Materialien, die Arbeitsschritte – seit Stradivaris Zeiten hat sich im anspruchsvollen Geigenbau fast nichts verändert.

„Ein Instrument mit besonderem Charakter kann nur in Handarbeit entstehen.“
Lukas Kehnen, Geigenbaumeister

Mit dem richtigen Holz fängt alles an.

Jeder Geigenkorpus besteht aus sehr speziellem Fichtenholz und Ahorn. Ideal sind Hölzer aus alpinen Hochregionen, denn da die Sommer dort kürzer sind, wachsen die Jahresringe gleichmäßiger und dichter. Für die Qualität des Instruments ist das essenziell.

Lukas Kehnen bezieht seine Bretter von einem Tonholzhändler, der ausgesuchte Bäume nach einem speziellen Verfahren aufschneidet und sie mindestens fünf Jahre lang unter kontrollierten Bedingungen
trocknet. Vom Wuchs bis zur Lagerung – es ist die Zeit, die das Holz besonders klingen lässt.

Eine Geige ist dann fertig, wenn sie fertig ist.

In einem Spitzeninstrument stecken rund 150 Arbeitsstunden; hin und wieder auch mehr. „Wichtig ist, dass man sich nicht hetzen lässt“, sagt Lukas Kehnen, „denn das stört die Konzentration.“ Das Ausstechen und Feinhobeln des Klangkörpers erfordert Hingabe und Geduld.

Messen, anklopfen, schleifen – die Arbeitsschritte wiederholen sich viele Male. Dabei taucht Lukas Kehnen ganz in seine Arbeit ein, vergisst auch mal die Zeit um sich herum. Ob ein Werkstück schließlich fertig ist, sagen ihm keine technischen Geräte, sondern seine Erfahrung und sein Gefühl.

Auch der Farbton macht die Musik.

Für die Lackierung verwendet Lukas Kehnen ausschließlich Substanzen, mit denen schon die alten italienischen Meister gearbeitet haben: Naturharze mit klangvollen Namen wie Schellack, Mastix, Sandarak und Manilakopal. Vor allem bei der Restaurierung alter Instrumente kann es dauern bis die richtige Mischung gefunden ist.

In keiner anderen Arbeitsphase ist Lukas Kehnen derart fokussiert wie beim Komponieren und Auftragen der Lackschichten. Irgendwann schaut er dann aber doch auf die Uhr: eine MeisterSinger Nº 01
mit braunem Veloursleder-Armband.

10 Fragen an... Geigenbaumeister Lukas Kehnen

MeisterSinger:
Herr Kehnen, was bedeutet Perfektion in Bezug auf Ihre Arbeit?

Lukas Kehnen:
Das kann ich schwer in Worte fassen. Ich höre und fühle einfach, wenn etwas perfekt ist.

MeisterSinger:
Welches Verhältnis haben Sie generell zu Qualität?

Lukas Kehnen:
Ich bin grundsätzlich kein Freund von Massenprodukten, aber ab und zu Fast Food ist ok.

MeisterSinger:
Wie oft schauen Sie bei der Arbeit auf die Uhr?

Lukas Kehnen:
Hin und wieder, um den Tag zu strukturieren. Wenn ich richtig vertieft in meine Arbeit bin, folge ich aber ganz meiner inneren Uhr.

MeisterSinger:
Wie gelingt es Ihnen am besten, nicht den Sekunden hinterher zu jagen?

Lukas Kehnen:
Ich fokussiere mich auf das, was direkt vor mir liegt. Alles Weitere wird möglichst ausgeblendet.

MeisterSinger:
In welchem Moment vergessen Sie die Zeit am liebsten?

Lukas Kehnen:
Beim Wildwasserpaddeln, am liebsten auf der Soča in Slowenien.

MeisterSinger:
Wem würden Sie gern 100 Stunden schenken, wenn Sie könnten?

Lukas Kehnen:
Meiner Familie, der ich für vieles sehr dankbar bin.

MeisterSinger:
Und wofür würden Sie sich gern 100 Stunden stehlen?

Lukas Kehnen:
Für eine Weinprobe in Cremona, der Hochburg des italienischen Geigenbaus.

MeisterSinger:
Wie viele Uhren besitzen Sie?

Lukas Kehnen:
Eine einfache Pegasus Quarz und seit kurzem eine MeisterSinger N° 01

MeisterSinger:
Was gefällt Ihnen besonders am MeisterSinger Konzept der Einzeigeruhr?

Lukas Kehnen:
Mit gefällt das aufgeräumte Design. Aber auch der Gedanke dahinter, also sich nicht zu sehr hetzen zu lassen.

MeisterSinger:
Wie spät ist es jetzt?

Lukas Kehnen:
16.05 Uhr

Schriftgestalter Lukas Schneider

„Gutes Schriftdesign ist die Kunst zu wirken, ohne dabei vordergründig aufzufallen.“